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ONTARIO. PROVINCIAL  COURT  JUDGES

Judge Richard Lajoie

Ontario Court of Justice EAST REGION

DIED MAY 18,2011

After a leaving a trail of endless destroyed lives.

LAJOIE, Richard The Honourable Judge Wednesday May 18, 2011 at the age of 62. Beloved husband and best friend of Rita Schryburt Lajoie. Loving father of Stephane (Karen) and Karine (Marc Duguay). Dear brother of Victor (Claudette St. Maurice). Proud godfather of Roxane Prud'homme (Marvin Murphy and young Philippe). Richard's message to his brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nephews, friends and colleagues: Live life to the fullest. A Celebration of Richard's Life will be held at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair & McGarry, 315 McLeod Street (at O'Connor) Sunday May 22 at 11 am.

 

Judge Richard Lajoie  formerly from Timmins judge is well known for his corruption and obstruction of justice.

Known for stretching his neck over the bench to leer at breasts of of female lawyers and prosecutors with comments such as of "how very nice it is to see you today" while using body language and facial expressions to say, "I'm a corrupt judge, I'm a pervert and because I have absolute power, and there is nothing you can do about it.". 

His choice of liquor on evenings before court hearings the following morning is copious quantities of red wine.

Justice Richard Lajoie removes himself from cases and then puts himself back on cases to make decisions that would otherwise not be made.

One of his former court clerks in Timmins was Sue Farrell, who is married to Doug Farrell, later a Staff Sergeant,  a key power figure in the Corrupt Timmins Police.

In Timmins Richard Lajoie was the judge of choice for the local Children's Aid Society or anyone else with the right connections.

In one famous interim custody hearing he gave custody to his court clerk (NOT Sue Farrell) who has worked next to him for years  then declared a conflict to remove himself from the case. The order was never varied. Later the father falsely pleaded guilty to abduction in return for a promise for access that to this writers knowledge was never kept. The lawyer in that case took a $5000 flat fee for the trial that never happened but resulted in a plea bargain that as mentioned previously was never kept or more to the point, resulted in unexpected permanent injustice.

He holds hearings in which he is a party to the proceedings.

If you would like to read more about Judge Richard Lajoie, visit http://www.permitted-purgery.com/  

In one case he did not like a father protesting on a street outside his court room or being called an "insult to justice" on the web site http://www.Timmins101.com 

Judge Richard Lajoie had the father arrested and thrown in jail on a charge of criminal defamation. Judge Richard Lajoie refused to testify after first claiming in a bail hearing that he was "afraid". Judge Richard Lajoie stunned the legal community by hearing the same matter several times in his own court.

If you have Richard Lajoie hearing a matter, expect injustice and be prepared for a corrupt connection to someone somewhere.

See more about Judge Richard Lajoie at: www.Timmins101.com

20110728 Judge releases cellblock video of alleged mistreatment by Ottawa police

20050730 Staff Sergeant Doug Farrell looks forward to working with council and the Timmins Police Services Board to get the new building up.

20101228 Ottawa police management mocked in video

 

 

Then there was that Quesnel case.. Does anyone have any copy of those court documents?

 

  • R. v. Fergus, 2006 CanLII 37565 (ON C.A.) 2006-11-03
    Ontario Court of Appeal for Ontario
    the trial judge misapprehended the evidence
  • R. v. M.J., 2006 CanLII 34702 (ON C.A.) 2006-10-18
    Ontario Court of Appeal for Ontario

    The trial judge does not appear to have taken into account the 8 days pre-trial custody and the time spent in pre-sentence house arrest.

 

  • R. v. B.J.M., 2007 ONCA 221 (CanLII) 2007-03-27
    Ontario Court of Appeal for Ontario

the sentencing judge did not consider whether the appellant met the criteria for a long-term offender designation. 

 

 

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